A sliding pocket door can be a good choice for a small bathroom, or as part of a generous set of interconnected living spaces.  In this post, we’ll highlight a few of the reasons people use a sliding pocket door system.  We’ll also show some photos of them installed in completed projects.  You can buy the doors off the shelf as a complete kit, or have your carpenter manufacture a bespoke design.  We’ve used sliding pocket doors to articulate different spaces in our Summerstrand, Balcombe and The Lookout projects.  The doors can be made in timber, glass or a mixture of materials.  Using frosted or acid etched glass is a really effective way of achieving an opaque screen if you don’t want to use a full timber door.

sliding pocket door with opaque glass panes in an award winning house by south devon architects andrew lethbridge associates

sliding pocket door hidden in the walls of an award winning house by south devon architects andrew lethbridge associates

 

Why Use A Sliding Pocket Door?

The main benefit of a sliding door is that it doesn’t require space within a room to swing open.  As a result, smaller rooms will feel more spacious and you have more options for laying out furniture.  Sliding doors are therefore particularly useful in ensuite bathrooms.  However, most of the sliding doors we have installed in completed projects are used to break down semi open plan living spaces.  Our clients will often fall in love with the idea of a flowing, open living space, however, it’s often nice to be able to close down certain spaces; particularly the sitting area.  Once dinner is finished, it’s great to be able to create a more intimate space to watch TV or listen to music.

The beauty of a pocket sliding door is that when it’s open it disappears fully into the wall.  This solution is much neater than hanging the door on one side of the partition.  All of the running gear is permanently concealed and the system has a real quality feel.  It just feels more ‘designed’.  As a result, when the doors are open and hidden within the walls, the spaces have that true ‘open plan’ feel.

Internal sliding door systems tend to be top hung, so there are no tracks or guides in the floor.  As a result, floor finishes can be seamlessly continued between the spaces.  You also don’t need much in the way of ironmongery.  Often a simple pull catch is all that is required and these discrete handles can be incorporated into the edge of the door for a really clean finish.  Sliding pocket door systems can be purchased ‘off the shelf’ in various designs, or you can have your contractor fabricate you a bespoke units like the ones featured in the images on this page which were made by WM Construction.

oak framed sliding pocket door with opaque glass panes in an award winning house by south devon architects andrew lethbridge associates

sliding pocket door with opaque glass panes and satin stainless steel finger pull

oak framed sliding pocket door with opaque glass panes in an award winning house by south devon architects andrew lethbridge associates

Are you thinking about remodelling your home using a sliding pocket door system to maximise the available space?  Perhaps you like the idea of including the system in your bespoke new build project?  We’d love to hear all about your ideas, so please get in touch and let’s see how we can help you bring your ideas to life.